Fauna at risk

Fauna at risk
Fauna at risk

Fauna at risk

While still exisitng in other parts of WA, the Bilby: a charasmatic marsupial distinguished by its “bunny-like ears”, has sadly been lost from the SWCC Region forever and more threatened species are at risk of being lost.

Threatened Aquatic Species

Threatened Aquatic Species
Threatened Aquatic Species

Threatened Aquatic Species

Between 2001 and 2017, the number of aquatic species (including wetland dependent birds) in the South West NRM region, which have been adequately searched for and are deemed to be, in the wild, either rare, at risk of extinction, or otherwise in need of special protection, and have been gazetted as such, have increased from 5 being listed to 23. Thus, there has been a 360% increase in aquatic species listed as threatened between 2001-2017.

Projected rise in temperature

Projected rise in temperature
Projected rise in temperature

Projected rise in temperature

The projected changes in temperature for the South West are severe enough to result in large parts of the current ranges of many species becoming unsuitable for those species.

Changes in average annual and seasonal temperatures can result in conditions that make a specific location unsuitable for that plant to grow or animal to thrive, i.e. the new temperature range is outside of that species’ optimal temperature range.

Flora at risk

Flora at risk
Flora at risk

Flora at risk

Western Australian flora is arguably some of the most unique in the world and has fascinated wildflower enthusiasts for generations. 78 flora species are threatened (DBCA, 2018) in the SWCC Region i.e: flora species which are declared as rare or likely to become extinct under the Wildlife Conservation Act 1950.

Fish Kill Events

Fish Kill Events
Fish Kill Events

Fish Kill Events

The number of fish kill events appears to be stable between 2000 and 2017 with between zero and three events per year in rivers and estuaries across the South West NRM region. The exception to this was 2015 when six events occurred, however no events were recorded in the last two years (2016 and 2017). Many of these events were linked to poor water quality due to a number of man-made changes to rivers and their catchments including increased nutrients, clearing of riparian and catchment vegetation and reduced flushing of rivers due to installation of barriers and changes in flow.

Effects of rainfall decline to date

Effects of projected rainfall decline
Effects of rainfall decline to date

Effects of projected rainfall decline

Rainfall in the south-west of Western Australia is now around 16 per cent below the long-term average. Less rainfall results in less water flowing into rivers and aquifers and to date there has been up to a 50% reduction in average run-off into rivers and streams, and up to a 30 per cent reduction in recharge of aquifers depending on the location.

Extent of water repellence

Extent of water repellence
Extent of water repellence

Extent of water repellence

Soil water repellence is the resistance of soils to wetting, sometimes to the extent that they remain dry even after significant rainfall events or irrigation.

Most of the soils (including in coastal and forest areas) in the South West NRM region are severely water repellent affecting agriculture production.