Vegetation cover change since 2000

From European settlement to the year 2000 vegetation cover on the Swan Coastal Plain (the area between the ocean and the scarp) had been reduced by 80%, leaving only a small proportion remaining (35,727 ha).1 (Ecotones, 2018). In the short 17 years since, a further 28.5% of remaining vegetation cover has been lost (minimum 10,172 ha).2 (Ecotones, 2018).

As many of us want to live near the beach, clearing along the Swan Coastal Plain for urban development remains an ongoing threat to the vegetation and the native species that rely on this vegetation.

Calls to action:

  • Prevent further loss of native vegetation where possible.
  • Plant native species in urban gardens along the Swan Coastal Plain to provide habitat and foraging for native birds and other animals.
  • Protect existing vegetation from ongoing threats such as invasive weeds and animals, grazing, Phytophthora Dieback, inappropriate fire regimes, illegal 4-wheel driving and rubbish dumping.
  • Undertake revegetation to supplement the loss of native vegetation.

Data Source

Land Monitor Veg Mask data 1988-2017. DBCA. Raster layers. Accessed from DBCA in Mar 2018.

Disclaimer

These statistics refer to all vegetation cover not just native vegetation cover.  Increases in vegetation cover in the Jarrah and Wheatbelt IBRA Regions could include a combination of native vegetation, plantations and woody weeds.

References

  1. Ecotones (2018). Environmental Snapshot GIS & Data Analysis. Report for South West Catchments Council.
  2. Ecotones (2018). Environmental Snapshot GIS & Data Analysis. Report for South West Catchments Council.