Fauna at risk

Fauna at risk While still existing in other parts of WA, the Bilby: a charismatic marsupial distinguished by its “bunny-like ears”, has sadly been lost from the SWCC Region forever and more threatened species are at risk of being lost. There are 2,203*(Ala.org.au, 2018) fauna species in the SWCC Region, 58 of which are threatened, seven…

Loss of native vegetation

Loss of native vegetation Clearing of native vegetation (historical, present and future) remains one of the major threats to terrestrial biodiversity in the south west. It contributes to the the physical loss of flora, fauna and their habitat; and reduces the resilience of the remaining vegetation and biodiversity to pressures such as weed invasion, vegetation…

Threatened Aquatic Species

Threatened Aquatic Species Between 2001 and 2017, the list of threatened aquatic species (including wetland dependent birds) in the South West NRM region has increased from five to 23. This represents a 360% increase in aquatic species listed as threatened between 2001 and 2017. These are species deemed either rare or at risk of extinction,…

Smooth Marron Populations

Smooth Marron Populations While past translocations of Smooth Marron (Cherax cainii) have resulted in an expansion of its distribution northward and eastward, there has also been a decline in its inland range and local abundances due to water quality decline and loss of habitat.  The populations have deteriorated over the past 40 years.  Monitoring of…

Aquatic invertebrates in forests

Aquatic invertebrates in forests Index 1: 69% of 29 stream sites within conservation reserves or state forest across the SWCC NRM region between 2005 and 2011 received an average AusRivAS rating indicating they were in good condition. Index 2: Condition stable. 82% of 11 stream sites monitored between 2005 and 2016, had the same average…

Water availability

Water availability There is around 685 GL/yr of water available under allocation limits in the South West region, 60% of which is surface water and 40% groundwater. There is a high proportion of resources fully allocated particularly in areas with the biggest population growth and economic development pressures. Most of the high-quality groundwater resources from…

Salinity and agriculture

Salinity and agriculture This is a key issue affecting agriculture in Western Australia, particularly in the eastern parts of the region. The implications of dryland salinity to the agricultural industry are widespread and include reduced crop yield, area of arable land, land capability and should also include the growing need to meet community and market…

Seagrass meadows

Seagrass meadows Geographe Bay supports the most extensive seagrass meadows in temperate Western Australia1 and around 9,500 hectares in waters < 10 m are in good condition2. The most common species is Posidonia sinuosa which is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN redlist. In Geographe Bay the P. sinuosa meadows are healthy with reasonably consistent density…

Coastal erosion risks

Coastal erosion risks The Peron Naturaliste region (the area from the Shire Rockingham to City of Busselton) has been identified as vulnerable to the impacts of coastal climate change. From now to 2100, approximately 200 metres wide strip is at risk from erosion along the whole extent of the coastline. Risks between now and 2100:…

Population growth

Population growth Between 2001 to 2016, SWCC regional population has grown by 36.7%, from 138,049 to 188,754 and total population projected to growth 223,480 by 2026 (i.e. 61.9% growth from 2001 to 2026)1 2 (Ecotones, 2018; ABS, 2018). Rapid urbanisation has occurred in coastal LGAs such as Busselton, Augusta-Margaret River, Harvey, Dardanup, Donnybrook-Balingup and Dardanup.…